Trayvon

 

About: This Blog post is about the Trayvon martin case. He was killed by George Zimmerman in florida and it caused a huge media frenzy. The reason for this was because it was proclaimed as a hate crime and people said that Zimmerman just shot Trayvon because he was black and he was doing nothing else wrong. People on Zimmerman’s side however said that wasn’t the case and that Trayvon attacked Zimmerman and that he acted in self defense. This caused a media outrage and it caused a separation because people were taking sides and it caused so much outreach.

Trayvon

I remember taking a law class in high school, and the Trayvon Martin case was the topic of conversation one day. After the verdict was released to the public and George Zimmerman was declared not guilty, most people wondered how he had gotten away with his crime. From a legal standpoint, the real mistake was charging George Zimmerman with second-degree premeditated murder when in actuality the charge should have been less. People also debated the necessity of stand your ground laws currently in place.

The debate leads to the question: do these stand your ground laws provide a fair defense of Zimmerman in this case? An article by Edward Champion on a forum called “The Reluctant Habits” discusses the faulty goals of stand your ground laws and how it allows people to get away with crime. According to Champion the laws have a racial undertone that have allowed white people like Zimmerman to walk free while punishing some black people for scattered crimes that were not as serious as those in the Zimmerman case. A black woman was sentenced to twenty years in prison for firing a warning shot, which doesn’t really make any sense to me, because although it probably wasn’t the smartest idea to start firing warning shot into the air, she didn’t hurt anyone unlike George Zimmerman. Between Champion’s article and my background in my legal class that I took in high school the issue in this case may be not just racism in general, but racism in the way laws are formed and enforced. Champion mentions that “A CU-Boulder study from last year revealed that 69 undergraduates and 254 police officers were more likely to shoot black suspects over Hispanics and whites.” The trend from the study makes the stand your ground laws racist with in their own language, allowing people’s biases to clear legal notice.

Based on my experience with the topic I think that stand your ground laws need to be reviewed and changed accordingly. Although benefits are an increase in tourism and an overall drop in crime, these incidences cant just continue to be brushed to the side. Trayvon Martin’s death is definitely a symbol of racism that might be alive in today’s world. But more then that, it exposes a problem in the legal system and reflects fears of people in American society.

 

https://ctools.umich.edu/portal/site/e2b1fd2a-5179-4164-93d8-71bcbc4dd25c/page/abab852d-56ee-4a1c-b974-86f12b02c4b4

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Student Athlete Standards

About: This essay is mainly about the struggles of being a student athlete. Its main points talk about how student athlete shouldn’t be held to the same academic standards as normal students because the basically do the jobs of two people and it is extremely difficult to do them both. It talks about athletes getting academic rewards for athletic achievements so help them cope with the pressure. I would help both academics and athletics because it would give motivation for both.

 

Student Athlete Standards

For years people have had many different opinions on the situation with

student-athletes having different academic standards. In the past, student athletes

needed a “2.0 grade-point average and a minimum SAT score of 1010 or an ACT score

of 86 sum of four scores to earn a Division I athletic scholarship” (Stinson ). These

NCAA standards are difficult for some athletes and easier for others. Another rule from

the past is that the athletes had to “ complete 14 core courses -four years of English

two years of math, two years of science (physical and natural), one year of additional

English, math or science, two years of social science courses”(Stinson). People

had different thoughts about the old rules, some good, some bad. The people who

supported the old standards felt it allowed for better time management between being

a student and an athlete. The people who did not support the old standards felt like it

should be raised, because it is too easy for athletes. Some people think the student

athlete is lacking in academics and too focused on sports. The NCAA thought it was

time for a change.

The NCAA came together and changed the rules. The NCAA approved the new rules

“in fall of 2012, it will start for incoming freshmen in 2016” (Gaither). The new rules are

that in order to get a Division I scholarship you “must have a 2.3 GPA and complete 16

core courses, four years of English, three years of math, two years of science (physical

and natural; one must be a lab), one year of additional English, math or science,

two years of social science, four years of additional core courses”(Stinson). This is

a big change for the athletes and their futures. It will be hard, and many will struggle

to receive a scholarship. Another rule is that “10 of these core courses have to be

completed before their senior year if they want to be a full qualifier” (Stinson). Not only

do they have to worry about maintaining their GPA, now they have to make sure they

complete 10 courses and pass before their senior year. The NCAA is hoping “when

the new rules kick in, the “student” role in a student-athlete’s life will take new meaning”

(Stinson). Some athletes do not make the grades, so they get redshirted. A redshirt

“would have to still complete 16 core classes, have a minimum GPA of 2.0 as well as

meet the sliding scale requirement for a corresponding SAT or ACT score to match their

GPA” (Stinson). Those who are redshirted do not get to play the whole season, but gets

to practice and get in shape, and also gets to focus hard on their studies. So the next

year, if they pass, they are more prepared for their upcoming year as a student and

athlete. The North Carolina High School Athletic Association did not agree with the rule

change and did not change their standards (Stinson). In the article it states that “despite

this upcoming new requirement from the NCAA, the North Carolina High School Athletic

Association plans on maintaining its current policy on academics eligibility” (Stinson).

This shows that there are people who disagree with the new rule change and people

who support the rule change.

People have different opinions on the subject of student-athletes. In some people’s

opinion, they think that athletes get treated differently from regular students, and that

athletes get easier work because they play a sport. In some cases, that may be true,

but many believe that it is not right. Then there are others that believe that everything is

fair between student-athletes and general students. The reason some people support

the new rule change is because they think it’s more fair, unlike the old rules where they

thought it was too easy and that student-athletes were getting special treatment. They

also think that student-athletes need to focus on being a student more than an athlete.

Then there are people who do not support the new rule change, because people think it

is easy for the athletes, but some people do not know that some student-athletes have

trouble getting a 2.0 GPA. Not all athletes have trouble, but some do and now it will be

harder for them to reach their goal, because many people do not know what their life is

like and how are hard it is for athletes.

The NCAA is trying their hardest to implicate a standard for high school students

athletes to be able to compete on an equal playing field when applying to colleges, but

yet we have the very controversial question of, are all high schools in a sense equal

when it comes to opportunity these athletes have in high school. Comparing suburban,

private, and inner city schools, we can clearly see that students do not have the same

learning opportunities. Student athletes who come from rich private schools and

suburban schools of middle to upper class communities will have greater opportunities

versus a student athlete who is from and inner city school who does not have the

funding as suburban schools have. Inner city schools do not have the funding to have

an equal amount of technology advancements that a suburban school would have.

Teachers who are a part of the inner city school system are statistically not as highly

qualified as a teacher who is part of a private school or suburban school.

​         Student athletes who attend high school in middle to upper class communities have

many more opportunities such as classes that are available for them to take. I know at

my high school we had over 100 different courses you could take. From regular, honors,

AP, and IB. We also had dual enrollment options were students were able to take as

upper class men and take classes at a local university to earn college credits. Student

athletes are required to take 16 core credit classes. 4 math, 4 english, 2 years of a

language, 1 fine arts credit, 3 social sciences, 1 natural science, and 1 physical science

credit. If we do not achieve a 2.3 or higher GPA during high school in those 16 core

credit classes then we are not eligible for a certificate from the NCAA clearing house to

receive a scholarship. Student athletes who go to high schools have many more class

opportunities to be successful in high school. Studies have shown that students who

are interested in the class they are taking they have an exponential chance of achieving

a higher grade. Students have shown through research studies that when they are not

interested in the course they are taking they do not succeed as well as students who

are interested in that subject being taken. Students athletes who attend high schools of

the lower class are much less likely to succeed given they do not have near the amount

of class opportunities. Therefore the student may be put into a science class he or she

does not find any interest in and they will not succeed as well as a student who has an

interest in these courses. We can not say that students who have an equal opportunity

when they clearly do not have the same class opportunities as some other students

may have. Studies prove that students with more interest in the class they choose will

lead to a higher grade and students with less interest will not succeed as well. Therefore

it is not fair to say that student athletes across the country are competing on the same

equal playing field.

​         Now taking a look into the classroom at the opportunities there. Schools of lower

class communities do not receive the funding that schools of middle to upper class

receive. They struggle to provide textbooks for all of the students. Schools of lower

class cant even provide textbooks to all the students. Some classes only provide a

classroom set of books that students are not allowed to take out of the classroom due

to the low amount of books they have. Students of middle and upper class have better

funding to their high schools and have the capability to provide every student with a

classroom set of books as well as textbooks that they may take home and use to study.

Students who are not able to take home their textbooks clearly do not even have the

same opportunity as other students to study the materials equally as students who

have a take home book. Once again just another reason why the GPA for the NCAA

clearing house is low. Many outsiders do not understand this because they have not

put themselves in the athletes shoes. There clearly are not equal opportunities for all

student athletes to learn at an equal level.

​         This inability to study the materials equally obviously puts some students at a clear

disadvantage. This also leads to lower standardized tests scores. I had to pay $800

to take my SAT prep class. Fortunately for me this was not a problem but for student

athletes who are of lower class may not have this opportunity even offered to them. Yet

people complain about why student athletes are held to a lower standard then a regular

student. Yes students who also attend these same schools of lower class who have to

maintain their high GPA to apply to colleges but they are given much more time to focus

on their studies. Student athletes of these lower class high schools are not even given

the same opportunity to study for these standardized tests which obviously leads to a

lower score.

​         Even though many high school student athletes may get into the university of their

choice they may not be held to the same standard then but they are surely held to

the same academic standard in college. On a personal level I spend countless hours

every day with my tutors, library, and academic center studying to get my grades to

the expectation I am held to by the university in order to receive a degree. We must be

fully committed to our team and our grades and find the perfect balance to be a very

successful student athlete. So while people complain athletes are not held to the same

standard as students in high school to apply to college once we get here we are held to

a standard that exceeds everyone else’s standard here as a student.

For a freshmen entering college the big transition scares a lot of people. The high

school you attended or the region you are from can be the deciding factor as to whether

you are ready for the big jump. College is the place where a lot of people mature and

develop into grown men and women, the extra four years help them to understand

and build toward the future, and find themselves and prepare for the next chapter of

their lives. Students come from all over the nation to attend large universities, like the

University of Michigan, some even come from around the world. We’ve all come from

different primary education backgrounds where some schools take their students above

and beyond in their academic careers, while others only finish the bare minimum if that.

So that means that coming into college we’re all not on the same page, we weren’t

taught all the same things by all the same people. Our levels of knowledge vary on the

educational spectrum.

Even though our high school educations may vary colleges and universities expect

the same from all of us, the utmost best. We all have to meet the same standard they

set. Students who are prepared for college and attended great high schools go into

college ready and able. Sadly students who weren’t prepared by their high schools

aren’t ready for the college lifestyle where time management and prioritization are

key. They have a harder time adapting or possibly don’t make it. It’s a sad truth, from

an athlete’s’ perspective it’s very important that they are prepared for the demands of

college. In an ideal world they’d all would be prepared, but the reality is a percentage

of student-athletes who don’t have great primary education backgrounds have a much

harder time adjusting regardless of all the support they receive. They must now balance

an already tough academic schedule on top of their athletic lives.

Entering college can be terrifying and exciting for many freshmen. It’s a brand new

environment to interact with along with a ton of new people to meet. A brand new social

pool way larger than any high schools could offer. Everything that came along with the

high school comes with college. All the people, the orientations, it’s on a whole new

scale. So that means the workload increases too. The work load in college scares a

lot of people and just talking about all the work that’s expected might give some chills.

Being a normal student in a large university is hard enough with all the lecture halls.

Just having hundreds of people in one class is all so hard to take it all in as a brand

new face in college. An average student is already expected to do so much, the strain

that is put on a college student athlete is practically double that. If student-athletes are

expected to live up to the average university student they face the challenge that most

student do not. No one comes to college to be mediocre, everyone wants the best for

themselves because it’s preparing us for the real world. So that means that student-

athletes are put to the same scale, achieving the best for yourself in college is already

difficult enough with just balancing school work. As a student-athlete playing my sport

has taught me that mediocrity is never acceptable having to balance a full life as a

student and a athletes leaves a lot of room for mediocrity to flow in when both demand

so much out of a student athlete. Research showed in a study named Playbook vs.

Textbook that there are three major themes that stated student-athletes had problems

with time management, prioritization skills, and guidance. This is all because of the

increase time demand placed upon athletes.

As a student-athlete you are expected to be able to keep your grades at a certain

level which contributes to your teams’ academic progress rate scale (APR). The APR

scale is detrimental to student athletes and their teams if they go below a certain level. It

can seriously cut down a university’s athletic programs, can cost scholarships for future

athletes, can cost the opportunity to appear in postseason games such as bowl games,

and hurt universities’ income as well. These are all big things that can seriously injure

a universities’ respect and stature. Individually students who fall below are also marked

as ineligible. Colleges are now demanding more out of students-athletes than expected

from a regular student. With higher expectations comes more responsibility and with

that comes more accountability. Universities are asking students athletes to raise the

bar, which means they have to be more prepared earlier on in high school. The students

who weren’t prepared at all in high schools chances of making it into college drops

tremendously. One of the first to areas to be affected by this in high schools are the

standardized testing scores. More students who may not necessarily be bad students

but given less opportunities will be weeded out.

The standards of athletics in he United States for high school students hoping to

continue their extra curricular activities at a D1 college have been on the rise just as fast

as the criticism for the same athletes having an easier time getting into college through

sports. Standardized testing in the US tries to fit every student, including student

athletes, through the same shaped system and those who participate in every other

extra curricular activity. The underlying difference is that kids with test anxiety are given

extra time. Those who cannot test in groups are given their own rooms, and athletes

who are tired must still take the test early in the morning. Although this is an extreme

and specific case, it happens frequently that students who simply aren’t good test takers

are given a relaxation card in school and athletes are simple expected to perform on the

same level as every Ivy League bound scholar in the room.

The educational system keeps a baseline for all students as far as academic

standards, but athletic standards aren’t even secondary. physical health is passed to

the side. Student athletes are therefore only seen as students with exhausting hobbies,

rather than something extracurricular to pursue. Standardization of the educational

system has set up many students of all interest areas for failure and changes are being

protested for those who have other interests than becoming a mathematician, the

catch to this scenario is so often that the interest group is still looking for people to use

their brains to get them to a higher education/life training. The idea of students using

their bodies as a profession for either a trade school or athletics are held as a

secondary idea and are considered even lower on the totem pole of good ideas as

certain majors that supposedly aren’t successful. It is a repetitive notion that sports

aren’t a career path, and they shouldn’t be seen as a way to access a career path.

College admittance is obtained in an almost unlimited number of ways. High school

teachers and counselors preach the formulas for ways to make an application the

most appealing to colleges, but whenever the topic of using athletics to get into college

arises, it is categorized as an old and insignificant method compared to the modern

techniques of making students applications attractive to colleges.

Finally, the last topic pertaining to the topic deals with how the system could be

reformed. It has been proposed that student athletes should get academics rewards

for athletic success. These ideas could include getting a pass on a final for winning a

championship or receiving extensions for assignments due after the due date when

the team wins the game. Depending on the situation, this system might actually hurt

the individual. While it is a interesting concept, it seems like an academic rewards idea

would do more harm than good.

​         The first flaw in the system is that student athletes who are far behind academically

in basic subjects may miss out on learning essential skills for later in life. Information

that supports this point comes from studies conducted by UNC reading specialist

Mary Willingham about the reading level of student athletes at the university. The

studies show that 60 % of the basketball and football players at the school read at an

eighth grade level and 8-10% read at a third grade level. This is just unacceptable and

something needs to be done about it because some of those star athletes will go on to

become professional and famous which means little kids will look up to them. Kids can’t

look up to someone who can’t read or hold a conversation because they are illiterate.

​ Many steps are already being taken to help change the way the aspect of being a

student athlete is being perceived. Comments like “Our challenge is to get the eligible,

not to get them educated,” which was said by Maryland graduate and President of the

NFL Players Association, Dominique Foxworth need to be corrected or just straight

up cut out. It’s the people at the top of the pyramid like this that poison the rest of the

people into thinking the same way and that its acceptable to just get by. We need to

help these student athletes whether its scheduling extra help or figuring out what else

the issue could be.

​         A main component of student athletes not succeeding is established schools

admitting them into academic programs that they are no where near ready for. They

are being thrown into an environment that they have no familiarity with and expect them

to be held to the same academic standards as a normal non-athlete. I understand that

some programs have to admit athletes that maybe a little under prepared because of

their athletic skill because otherwise the quality of the sport wont be as high and it wont

be as competitive. This means that there needs to be a balance between athletics and

academics because we cant have kids fall behind in school but at the same time we

cant have the level of sports decline because college sports supporters are at an all

time high and that can’t be destroyed because of an issue like this.

​         However, giving student athletes academic rewards for performing on the field also

have its upsides. If a player for instance gets a day extension on an assignment if they

win a game then it will naturally make the athlete want to perform better in order to

win to get that extension. This would in turn make the quality of the school work better

because the athlete would have more time to work on it and turn it in and it would also

give athletes more motivation to work harder and win more games in order to get more

extensions. It is a “win-win” for school and athletics.

​        Of course my opinion is that athletes should get a bit of special treatment because

I happen to be an athlete and I can speak from experience it is not easy to do both.

You are asked to do the work of two people by yourself and you don’t get any breaks.

Athletes tend to get exhausted and that affects both schoolwork and field play as well.

Another reward that an athlete could get would be if they or the team wins a national

championship then they have the option to not take a final if they have a certain grade

point average for instance. It would alleviate a lot of stress off the athlete’s shoulders

because they would be able to just keep the grade that they had if they did good work

throughout the year and kept their grades up. This would also encourage athletes to do

better in school he whole year in order to not have to take the final and be excused.

​In conclusion, the idea of rewarding students for athlete success has its ups and downs

but I think that it is a good idea because it would help balance out the workload. It

would allow student athletes to have a social, school, and academic life while getting a

reasonable amount of sleep at the same time because if they aren’t balanced then there

aren’t enough hours in the day to do all three of those things and those three things are

vital to be a healthy student and being able to experience all aspects of college life, not

just being over loaded with school and sports.

Annotated bibliography

1. Gaither, Steven J. “New NCAA Eligibility Standards Come Under Scrutiny.” Diverse

Issues in Higher Education 30.5 (2013): 7-8. ProQuest. Web. 25 July 2014.

​In this article I will be talking about the rule changing and how people feel about it.

There is a bunch of great information and quotes.

2. Gardiner, Andy. “NCAA Enacts Rule Changes.” USA TODAY Oct 28 2011. ProQuest.

Web. 25 July 2014.

​This article I will be discussing on the facts and the options of other people and how the

change will affect them on some level and ask they are going to deal with the new rules.

There is also a lot of great information on the NCAA that I will focus on in this article.

3. Stinson, Shawn. “Upcoming Rule Emphasizes Academics For Athletes.”

yourdailyjournal.com July 22 2014. Web. 25 July 2014.

​In this article I will mainly be focusing on the rules from the past and the rules that are

going to change in the fall of 2016. Also on how that came about changing the rules.

Should athletes be held to the same academic standard when applying to colleges?

NCAA Raises The Bar For Academic Standard To Get Through Clearing House

The NCAA’s new eligibility standards for prospective student-athletes go into effect for

the 2016 class but begin applying to this fall’s high school freshmen. To be eligible for

a scholarship and compete at a Division I institution, a high school student must have

done the following:

16: Number of core courses required for NCAA eligibility

10: Number of core courses that must be completed by the beginning of a high school

athlete’s senior year

7: Number of 10 initial core courses that must be in English, math or science

2.3: Minimum GPA in those 16 core courses (up from 2.0)

2.5: Minimum GPA for junior college transfer

So who is to blame? The kids or the system?

“Some have a core-course list with 50 to 100 courses, giving the student a great

opportunity to get the number they need. Others have 20, and you need to have 16 [to

meet NCAA eligibility standards]. That’s unfair and to no fault of a student. It’s about

where they grew up, yet they’re held to the same measurement.”

http://espn.go.com/college-sports/story/_/id/8236949/ncaa-increases-minimum-

eligibility-standards-division-student-athletes

Student Athletes Receiving Money For Food, Transportation, and Clothing

A 2010 study from the National College Players Association found that Division I

athletes on a full scholarship in 2009 were left with an average shortfall of $2,951/

year from their scholarship. Scholarships cover tuition, room and board, and books

and supplies, but athletes are left to cover expenses such as food, clothing, and

transportation.

Schools and conferences will not be required to offer the extra money to student-

athletes. Emmert did not want to force their hand on this potentially controversial

measure, especially if schools would have to cut scholarships in other places to be able

to afford the extra $2,000.

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/schooled_in_sports/2011/10/

ncaa_raises_minimum_gpa_for_incoming_student-athletes.html

http://fairtest.org/how-standardized-testing-damages-education-pdf

This resource is about the flaws in the past systems for standardized testing in the

United States and how the different organizations and plans to improve the system have

only postpone the problem. The state and federal policy’s on testing standards don’t

lend themselves to effective changes to the system of education.

https://www.presidentschallenge.org/challenge/

Administering of the presidential physical fitness tests are often mandatory for public

middle schools and high schools, and yet if students do not pass these tests, they are

still permitted to move up to the next grade, and they are still permitted to graduate. It is

a difference in standards that our brains must be at a minimum standard to achieve, but

bodily health and fitness are disregarded as important.

http://web1.ncaa.org/ECWR2/NCAA_EMS/NCAA_EMS.html

The NCAA clearing house is another form of athlete standards that most other students

are unaware of. The application process for athletes is also much more intensive due

to the athletic application process, so student ather eels must focus on both academics

and athletics.

Athletes In College Are Held To The Same Academic Standard.

Even though many high school student athletes may get into the university of their

choice they may not be held to the same standard then but they are surely held to

the same academic standard in college. On a personal level I spend countless hours

every day with my tutors, library, and academic center studying to get my grades to

the expectation I am held to by the university in order to receive a degree. We must be

fully committed to our team and our grades and find the perfect balance to be a very

successful student athlete. So while people complain athletes are not held to the same

standard as students in high school to apply to college once we get here we are held to

a standard that exceeds everyone else’s standard here as a student

The University of Michigan Academic Team

What Motivates A Student Athlete To Succeed In College

(a) building positive relationships with family members, coaches, faculty, and mentors

had a direct affect on their self-esteem, self-confidence, and their ability to be a success

in a collegiate academic environment; (b) it was important for these athletes to develop

a solid academic foundation at an early age; and (c) the challenges female, African

American student athletes encounter on campus as a result of their race and gender

need to be addressed regularly and consistently. The data also revealed that the

student athletes who had a strong support system exhibited positive attitudes and

achieved academic success.

We can not hold all students whether athletes or not to the same academic standard

due to many reasons listed above that show what the make up of a successful student

has. Many do not have a good support system from the time they were born all the way

up until they are going to college. So they would need to learn how to be proficient in

their studies on their own. In college it is a whole new world they have many resources

available to keep you on the right track in being academically successful. So how can

we expect students to be successful in high school without a support system? We cant.

Therefore we should not all be held to the same academic standard.

Intercollegiate athletics, academic achievement, and the female, African American

student athlete

Moody, Belvia Denise. Texas A&M University – Commerce, ProQuest, UMI

Dissertations Publishing, 2011. 3467964.

Tower, Danielle. “Relationship Between Athletic and Academic Success: A Pilot

Study.” Digital Uconn. University of Connecticut, 1 May 2008. Web. 7 July 2014.

<http%3A%2F%2Fdigitalcommons.uconn.edu%2Fcgi%2Fviewcontent.cgi%3Farticle%3

D1048%26context%3Dsrhonors_theses>.

This study aims to reveal that a competitive sports culture exists in the United States,

and due to this sports culture and competitive disposition, student athletes are more

motivated in academic endeavers. Previous research describes sports cultures;

however, the current study investigated the factors impacting academic motivation

and sport motivation. Furthermore, the interrelationship of these two factors was

assessed. A qualitative approach, using semi-structured interviews with four high school

varsity student athletes (two male; two female), was used as the tool in attempts to

support these claims. The research hypothesis suggested that high school students

who participate in the equivalent of college non-revenue sports, have a competitive

disposition which also motivates them to perform well in school.

http://fairtest.org/how-standardized-testing-damages-education-pdf

This resource is about the flaws in the past systems for standardized testing in the

United States and how the different organizations and plans to improve the system have

only postpone the problem. The state and federal policy’s on testing standards don’t

lend themselves to effective changes to the system of education.

https://www.presidentschallenge.org/challenge/

Administering of the presidential physical fitness tests are often mandatory for public

middle schools and high schools, and yet if students do not pass these tests, they are

still permitted to move up to the next grade, and they are still permitted to graduate. It is

a difference in standards that our brains must be at a minimum standard to achieve, but

bodily health and fitness are disregarded as important.

http://web1.ncaa.org/ECWR2/NCAA_EMS/NCAA_EMS.html

The NCAA clearing house is another form of athlete standards that most other students

are unaware of. The application process for athletes is also much more intensive due

to the athletic application process, so student ather eels must focus on both academics

and athletics.

Arne Duncan. “Time to Bring Your “A” Game-in Academics and Athletics.” U.S.

Department of Education. U.S. Department of Education, 11 Jan. 2012. Web. 31 July

2014. <http://www.ed.gov/news/speeches/time-bring-your-game-academics-and-

athletics>.

This article mainly focuses on Presidents of schools reducing academic stress to

student athletes. This has cause coaches to be able to grow these huge successful

sports programs for a long time now. It also raises the issue of setting the bar higher

for student athletes and requiring teams to graduate at least half of their players to be

eligible to participate in post season play. This article also talks about the best time in

college sports when it was the most popular and how schools focused more on sports

then academics.

Power, Clark. “Athletics vs. Academics.” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com,

14 Jan. 2014. Web. 31 July 2014. <http://www.huffingtonpost.com/clark-power/athletics-

vs-academics_b_4592926.html>.

This mainly talks about schools that just push their students along and don’t really worry

about academics and just focus on sports. It highlights that 60% of UNC’s basketball

and football players read below and eighth grade level and how 8-10% read below a

third grade level. It talks about the Academic Progress Rate (APR) and how it might

be the best attempt from the NCAA to keep track of student athletes and how they are

doing.